Public Lending Right Committee, Annual report 2012-13

Annual report 2012–13

Public Lending Right Committee—Annual report 2012–13 (PDF1 MB)

 

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Contact the department

Under the Administrative Arrangements Order issued on 18 September 2013, the regional development, local government and territories functions of the former Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport were transferred to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (www.infrastructure.gov.au). Arts and culture functions were transferred to the Attorney-General’s Department (www.ag.gov.au) and sports policy and related functions were transferred to the Department of Health (www.health.gov.au).

Access this report online

To access an online version of this annual report and more information about the Ministry for Arts visit www.arts.gov.au.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2013

ISSN 1034-330X

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With the exception of the Commonwealth Coat of Arms and where otherwise noted all material presented in this document is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/) licence.

 

The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the links provided) as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/legalcode).

The document must be attributed as the Public Lending Right Committee Annual Report 2012–13, Attorney General’s Department.

Authorised and published by the Australian Government
Attorney-General’s Department
Ministry for the Arts
www.arts.gov.au/literature/lending_rights

 

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Letter

Senator the Hon George Brandis QC
Attorney-General
Minister for the Arts
Parliament House
CANBERRA ACT 2600

Dear Minister

I am pleased to submit this report in accordance with Section 19 of the Public Lending Right Act 1985 (the Act). The report covers the 2012–13 financial year and is the twenty-sixth annual report of the Public Lending Right Committee since the Act came into effect.

From its commencement in 1974 to the present, Public Lending Right (PLR) has made payments to eligible Australian creators and publishers as a measure of recompense for their books being available in public lending libraries. The Committee is proud of the statutory role it plays in delivering this longstanding and popular Australian Government cultural program.

The Committee is also pleased to assist with and advise on the Educational Lending Right (ELR) scheme, a complementary administrative program established in 2000–01 that provides recompense for works available in educational libraries.

Together, PLR and ELR continue to support the enrichment of Australian culture by encouraging the creation and publication of Australian books. As the interview with young adult fiction author Jack Heath in this report demonstrates, PLR and ELR recipients appreciate the income and acknowledgement provided through the schemes. Mr Heath’s comment that the schemes “provide a financial incentive to make literature which lasts” is gratifying and suggests that the schemes are fulfilling their objectives.

In the 2012–13 financial year the Committee approved PLR payments totalling $9.386 million to 7901 eligible creators and publishers. In addition, ELR payments totalling $11.496 million were made to 9865 eligible creators and publishers. Payments for both schemes were made in June 2013.

I am pleased to note that creators and publishers are increasingly utilising the services provided through Lending Rights Online. In 2012–13, more than 51 per cent of claimants utilised this convenient online service to manage their contact and banking details, submit title claims and/or view their payment history online.

On behalf of the Committee I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution made by the Ministry for the Arts, the libraries that assist in the annual surveys and the many others involved in the operation of the PLR and ELR schemes. I would also like to thank my fellow members of the Committee for their contribution in 2012–13.

Yours sincerely

Signature of Evelyn Woodberry, Chair of the Public Lending Right Committee

Evelyn Woodberry
Chair
Public Lending Right Committee
10 October 2013

 

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Public Lending Right scheme

Public Lending Right (PLR) is a scheme established by the Australian Government to make payments to eligible creators and publishers on the basis that income is lost from the availability of their books in public lending libraries.

The scheme also aims to enrich Australian culture by encouraging the growth and development of Australian writing and publishing.

The Public Lending Right Act 1985 (the Act) provides that the Minister may ‘approve or modify a scheme for and in relation to the making of payments to persons in respect of books’. For the purposes of the Act, a PLR Committee is appointed by the Minister to administer the PLR scheme.

The current Public Lending Right Scheme was gazetted on 12 June 1997. It was modified on 22 April 2013 (Modification No. 1 of 2013) to reflect payment rates approved by the former Parliamentary Secretary for the Arts, the Hon Michael Danby MP, for eligible claimants in 2012–13.

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Public Lending Right Committee membership 2012–13

Chair

Ms Evelyn Woodberry (NSW)

Appointed 19 March 2007 for a three-year term.
Reappointed 4 March 2010 for a three-year term.
Reappointed 5 March 2013 for a two-year term.

Representatives of Australian Authors

Dr Georgia Blain (NSW)

Appointed 11 March 2013 for a three-year term.

Representative of Australian Publishers

Mr Michael Heyward (VIC)

Appointed 2 May 2011 for a three-year term.

Representative of Australian Libraries

Ms Christine Mackenzie (VIC)

Appointed 7 December 2008 for a three-year term.
Reappointed 16 February 2012 for a three-year term

National Library of Australia Representative

Ms Christine Foster (ACT)

Appointed 30 August 2004 for an indefinite period.

Attorney-General’s Department Representative

Ms Peter Treyde (ACT)

Resigned effective 22 August 2012

Ms Kirsti Haipola (ACT)

Appointed 22 August 2012 for an indefinite period.

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Public Lending Right Committee members


 Image of Evelyn Woodberry (Chair).
Evelyn Woodberry (Chair)

Image of Michael Heyward.
Michael Heyward

Image of Christine Mackenzie.
Christine Mackenzie   

Image of Christine Foster.
Christine Foster  

Image of Georgia Blain.
Georgia Blain

Image of Peter Treyde.
Peter Treyde 

Image of Kirsti Haipola.
Kirsti Haipola

 

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Administration of the scheme

While the PLR Committee administers the scheme, its day-to-day operation is undertaken by staff in the Collections and Cultural Heritage Branch in the Ministry for the Arts, Attorney-General’s Department (the department), under delegation from the Committee.

The Committee wishes to record its appreciation for the support provided by the department.

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How the scheme operates

Australian creators and publishers are invited to submit claims for their books to the department. PLR payments to eligible creators and publishers are determined by the number of copies of their books estimated to be held in public lending libraries in Australia.

This information is extrapolated from an annual survey of the books held in a sample of public lending libraries. If the survey results indicate that 50 or more copies of an eligible book are held in public libraries across Australia, a payment may be made.

Books are surveyed annually for two consecutive financial years following the year of publication. If, following the second year, a book is still held in sufficient numbers in public lending libraries, it will be re-surveyed every three years. Books scoring less than 50 copies in the second or subsequent surveys are dropped from the survey cycle.

The following eligibility criteria apply to the PLR scheme.

  • Eligible creators must be citizens or permanent residents of Australia.
  • Eligible creators (maximum of five per book) may include authors, editors, illustrators, translators or compilers.
  • Eligible publishers may include publishers whose business consists wholly or substantially of the publication of books and who regularly publish in Australia (i.e. at least one new book or revised edition in the preceding three-year period); self-publishing creators; and non-profit organisations that publish to further their aims and objectives.

More information about how the scheme operates can be obtained from the department’s Lending Rights team or from the Lending Rights website: www.arts.gov.au/literature/lending_rights.

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New claimants

During 2012–13, 584 new claimants registered for the program.

Table 1 illustrates the number of new claimants registered by program year since 1985, when PLR was first automated.

Table 1 Number of new claimants registered by program year
YEAR NUMBER OF NEW CLAIMANTS
84–85 5437
85–86 417
86–87 426
87–88 501
88–89 783
89–90 826
90–91 689
91–92 867
92–93 1081
93–94 1054
94–95 927
95–96 1367
96–97 996
97–98 1035
98–99 1004
99–00 876
00–01 850
01–02 736
02–03 811
03–04 790
04–05 738
05–06 695
06–07 626
07–08 814
08–09 758
09–10 756
10–11 723
11–12 669
12–13 584

 

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New claims registered

The number of new claims registered for the 2012–13 program was 10 050.

Table 2 illustrates the number of new claims registered by program year since 1985, when PLR was first automated.

Table 2 Number of new claims registered by program year
YEAR CREATORS PUBLISHERS TOTAL
84–85 16 472 14 408 30 880
85–86 1210 1161 2371
86–87 1391 1134 2525
87–88 1478 1251 2729
88–89 2153 1508 3661
89–90 2330 1351 3681
90–91 2027 1579 3606
91–92 3061 1853 4914
92–93 2294 1715 4009
93–94 2892 1847 4739
94–95 2789 1873 4662
95–96 3337 2448 5785
96–97 3452 2301 5753
97–98 3593 2527 6120
98–99 3922 3430 7352
99–00 2979 2089 5068
00–01 3972 3176 7148
01–02 2954 2302 5256
02–03 3151 2542 5693
03–04 3169 2188 5357
04–05 3393 2397 5790
05–06 3438 2168 5606
06–07 3103 2243 5346
07–08 3817 2674 6491
08–09 4772 3242 8014
09–10 4711 3814 8525
10–11 4821 3744 8565
11–12 4950 4286 9236
12–13 6131 3919 10 050

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New books registered

The number of new books registered for the 2012–13 program was 3127.

Table 3 illustrates the number of new books registered by program year, since 1985 when PLR was first automated.

 

Table 3 Number of new books registered by program year
YEAR NUMBER OF BOOKS
84–85 20 848
85–86 1632
86–87 1636
87–88 1646
88–89 1731
89–90 2100
90–91 1970
91–92 2835
92–93 2225
93–94 2143
94–95 2331
95–96 2954
96–97 3102
97–98 3038
98–99 2988
99–00 2517
00–01 3811
01–02 2703
02–03 2859
03–04 2769
04–05 3007
05–06 3028
06–07 2808
07–08 2934
08–09 3782
09–10 3287
10–11 3449
11–12 4062
12–13 3127

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Library survey

A statistical consultant engaged by the department has designed sampling and survey procedures for the collection of data on public library book stocks and the subsequent estimation of copies held for payment purposes.

The total book stock of eligible Australian public libraries registered in the PLR database for 2012–13 was 34 557 289. Individual public libraries with a book stock of less than 15 000 are not selected for survey.

For the 2012–13 PLR survey 25 libraries were selected to participate. These libraries held 42.03 per cent of the total book stock of all Australian public libraries. They included catalogues of public libraries administered by four state governments and 21 regional library networks with book stock figures ranging from 46 819 to 2 518 476.

For the first time the PLR library survey was conducted using an automated matching process in all of the 25 participating libraries.

Appendix 1—lists the 100 highest scoring books: 2010–11 survey to 2012–13 survey.

Appendix 2—lists the 100 highest scoring books: 1974–75 survey to 2012–13 survey.

Payments

The PLR Committee recommended to the Minister for the Arts an increase in the PLR payment rates for 2012–13. The increased rates of payment were approved by the former Parliamentary Secretary for the Arts, the Hon Michael Danby MP, on 22 April 2013.

The rate per copy of each eligible book was $1.96 for creators and 49 cents for publishers compared with $1.86 and 46.5 cents in 2011–12.

The PLR Committee approved annual payments of $9.386 million for 2012–13, to be distributed to 7901 claimants of which 7639 were creators (3898 females and 3741 males) and 262 were publishers. Payments were made in June 2013.

On 18 April 2011, the former Minister for the Arts, the Hon Simon Crean MP, approved changes to the Public Lending Right Scheme 1997, including the capacity to increase the minimum payment to claimants in future years. On 13 September 2011, the former Minister made the Public Lending Right Scheme 1997 Determination 2011 (No. 1), which increased the PLR minimum payment amount from $50 to $100 for 2012–13 and subsequent financial years. Despite increasing administrative costs and increases to the PLR rates of payments, the previous PLR minimum payment amount of $50 had remained unchanged since 1997. The change to the minimum payment threshold took effect in the 2012–13 financial year.

Appendix 3—lists the range of payments by number of claimants.

Appendix 4—lists the range of payments by amount of payment.

Appendix 5—lists the largest payments to creators.

Appendix 6—lists the largest payments to publishers.

Program expenses

Administrative/operational costs incurred in the annual operation of the PLR scheme included:

  • advertising and promotion
  • committee expenses and allowances
  • computer costs (software support, development and licence fees; supplies)
  • payments to libraries and library system vendors for participation in the annual survey
  • specialist accessioning services
  • statistical advice on the annual survey, and
  • production and distribution of claimant advice letters.

Other operational costs, including salaries of departmental officers, were met from departmental funds.

Table 4 PLR expenditure for the 2012–13 program*
ITEM AMOUNT ($)
Annual payments approved $9 385 549.02
Adjusting/deferred payments made for previous programs $228.78
Administration/operational costs $408 748.11
Previous program commitments  
TOTAL $9 794 525.91

 

* This information has not been audited. Audit details concerning the financial and staffing matters relating to the administration of the PLR scheme are published in the consolidated financial statements in the annual report of the department.

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Freedom of Information

During the 2012–13 financial year no requests were received pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act 1982.

Educational Lending Right

Educational Lending Right (ELR) is an Australian Government cultural program administered by the Ministry for the Arts. Introduced in 2000–01, Australia remains the only country with a comprehensive ELR scheme. The eligibility criteria applying to the PLR scheme also apply to the ELR scheme. Full details on ELR are in the Educational Lending Right Policies and Procedures 2011, available at the Lending Rights website:www.arts.gov.au/literature/lending_rights.

In the 2012–13 financial year the ELR scheme made payments totalling $11.496 million to 9865 claimants of whom 9497 were creators (4923 females and 4574 males) and 368 were publishers whose books are held in educational libraries, including school, Technical and Further Education (TAFE) and university libraries. In addition to the new claims registered in Table 2, most of which were for both PLR and ELR, an additional 494 ELR-only claims were registered in 2012–13 (275 creator claims; 219 publisher claims), resulting in an additional 175 ELR-only books registered in this program year. ELR payments were made in June 2013.

Consistent with PLR, the ELR minimum payment amount has increased from $50 to $100 for 2012–13 and subsequent financial years.

Appendix 7—lists the 100 highest scoring books: 2012–13 ELR survey.

Lending Rights Online

The Lending Rights Online (LRO) service provides claimants with convenient access at any time to:

  • register as creators or publishers
  • submit title claims for books
  • update their contact and banking details, and
  • view their payment history.

The number of claims lodged online through LRO has doubled in the past two years. The department is continuing to improve LRO through the development of additional services and functionality.

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Feature Interview

Image of Jack Heath.

Jack Heath

The Ministry for the Arts sat down with young adult fiction author Jack Heath to talk about his creative practice, the importance of public and educational libraries, and what the Public Lending Right and Educational Lending Right schemes mean to him as an author.

On his creative process and influences

What attracted you to writing as a career and what attracted you to the young adult genre?

I’ve always loved novels, and writing was a way for me to better understand how they worked—that’s what drew me to this career. The Young Adult category holds particular appeal to me because I love so many genres—sci-fi, horror, romance, crime—and YA lets me blend them all together.

Tell us about your creative process. Where do you get your inspiration for stories and characters from? How long does it take you to write a new book?

Once I have an idea for a story, which usually comes from a science journal, I sketch out a few key scenes (often the prologue, the epilogue and a chapter somewhere in the middle) and then start writing. I like to define characters by their actions, so the story has to come first. Once I know what the story is, and what problems the characters will need to solve, I know what sorts of people they will be. Most of my books have started with a theoretical or emerging technology which creates a problem.

It takes about a hundred hours to write a book and another hundred to edit it (with help from friends, family, agents, publishers) but that doesn’t include daydreaming time—which can last for years!

Which Australian authors inspired you growing up and which authors inspire you today?

As a kid, I must have borrowed every Jackie French, Emily Rodda and Catherine Jinks book my school library had. Each of those authors wrote (and writes) the sort of genre-bending mysteries that I still love. These days I’m a huge admirer of Justine Larbalestier, Tara Moss, Markus Zusak and Matthew Reilly, each of whom pushes the boundaries of what a book is supposed to be.

On being a National Year of Reading Ambassador in 2012

In 2012 you were an Ambassador for the National Year of Reading. What attracted you to this role and what did it involve?

Reading has given me a career, an identity, an appreciation of the world I live in and an understanding of the people who inhabit it. How could I not want to share that? [The role] required me to do a lot of the things I was doing anyway, but more so. I think I did more school visits, literary events and book-related blogs and videos in 2012 than in any year before or since.

Why do you think reading is important for children and young adults?

Storytelling is how we pass on ideas which deserve to be remembered but which, without interesting characters and plots, would be forgotten. Reading isn’t the only way to absorb stories, but thanks to near-universal literacy, public libraries and various other factors, it’s by far the most accessible.

On libraries and Australian children’s and young adult literature

You have had your books in public and educational libraries for a number of years. Why do you think libraries are an important community resource?

Public libraries are the world’s greatest force for equality. I’m not a wealthy man, but I have access to every book Jeff Bezos has ever read, and then some. Thanks to libraries, many people are both poorer and better-read than I am. The internet’s reputation as the great leveller has been exaggerated, since you need expensive devices and download plans just to get to it—unless, again, you’re at a library.

What do you think makes Australian children’s and young adults’ literature unique and enduring?

Inevitably, a writer’s location shapes their writing. Australia has barren deserts, snowy mountains, bustling cities and impenetrable forests. We have some of the newest technologies (the Zebedee 3-D mobile laser mapping system) and the oldest technologies (the Brewarrina fish traps) in the world. We have the world’s deadliest animals and the cutest. These bizarre juxtapositions are perfect for spurring on creativity in Australian writing.

Could you share your thoughts with us on the quality, strength and creativity of Australian children’s and young adults’ literature?

Obviously I’m biased, but it seems to me that almost every kind of story was done first (or at least done best) by an Australian author. Galax-Arena [by Gillian Rubinstein] was far more sophisticated than The Hunger Games and pre dated it by thirteen years. In the Blood by Jackie French brought vampires into the 21st Century long before Twilight did.

On a writing career and the PLR and ELR schemes

Are you a full-time author? What other roles/jobs/careers do you juggle to be able to pursue your career as a young adult author?

I was a full-time writer from 2006 until 2011, when I took on a second job so my wife and I could buy a house. I spent two years working in a call centre by day and writing at night. A generous grant from artsACT and the ACT government allowed me to quit that job so that I could edit a thriller set in Canberra called Replica. These days I work part-time in electronics retail and write four days per week.

What do PLR and ELR payments mean to you as an author?

PLR and ELR payments make up a significant portion of my income. It is in part thanks to them that I can afford to be a full-time author with a part-time job, rather than a part-time author with a full-time job. This means that I can spend more time on each book, which in turn improves the quality.

More broadly, why are the PLR and ELR schemes important?

Lending rights schemes provide a financial incentive to make literature which lasts. To earn an advance from a publisher, an author must write a good book. To earn royalties from book sales in the years following publication, an author must write a great book. But to keep earning PLR/ELR payments, an author must write a classic so enduring that readers will keep borrowing it for decades. It is telling that our society rewards this level of creativity and skill.

Jack Heath is the author of six action-packed books for young adults. He started writing his first book, The Lab, when he was 13 and had a publishing contract at 18. Jack was a National Year of Reading Ambassador in 2012 and is on the board of the ACT Writers Centre. Jack’s new book, Replica, will hit shelves (in book stores, libraries and online) in 2014.

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Appendix 1:

PLR—100 highest scoring books 2010–11 to 2012–13

The table below lists the top 100 books held in public lending libraries for the last three years.

It is based on the results of the three most recent PLR surveys conducted during 2010–11, 2011–12 and 2012–13.

  AUTHOR   TITLE
1   Reilly, Matthew   The five greatest warriors
2   Marsden, John   Tomorrow, when the war began
3   Li, Cunxin,   Mao’s last dancer
4   Lester, Alison   Are we there yet? A journey around Australia
5   Reilly, Matthew   Scarecrow and the Army of Thieves
6   Fox, Mem   Possum magic
7   Tsiolkas, Christos   The slap
8   Reilly, Matthew   The six sacred stones
9   Winton, Tim   Breath
10   Morrissey, Di   The silent country
11   Morrissey, Di   The plantation
12   Morrissey, Di   The opal desert
13   Brooks, Geraldine   Caleb’s crossing: a novel
14   Fox, Mem   Where is the green sheep?
15   Nunn, Judy   Maralinga
16   Do, Anh   The happiest refugee: the extraordinary true story of a boy’s journey from starvation at sea to becoming one of Australia’s best loved comedians
17   Courtenay, Bryce   Fortune cookie
18   Courtenay, Bryce   The story of Danny Dunn
19   Brooks, Geraldine   People of the book
20   Grenville, Kate   The secret river
21   Bland, Nicholas   The very cranky bear
22   Courtenay, Bryce   Fishing for stars
23   Courtenay, Bryce   The Persimmon tree
24   Allen, Pamela   Grandpa and Thomas and the green umbrella
25   French, Jackie   Pete the sheep
26   McInerney, Monica   Lola’s secret
27   Nunn, Judy   Tiger men
28   Morrissey, Di   Monsoon
29   McInerney, Monica   At home with the Templetons
30   Garner, Helen   The spare room
31   Morrissey, Di   The islands
32   Reilly, Matthew   Seven ancient wonders
33   Nunn, Judy   Floodtide
34   Temple, Peter   Truth
35   Machin, Susan   I went walking
36   Gleitzman, Morris   Tickled onions and other funny stories
37   Grenville, Kate   Sarah Thornhill
38   Zusak, Markus   The book thief
39   Allen, Pamela   Shhh! little mouse
40   Morton, Kate   The distant hours
41   Grenville, Kate   The lieutenant
42   Marsden, John   The dead of the night
43   McInerney, Monica   Those Faraday girls
44   Byrski, Liz   Trip of a lifetime
45   Marsden, John   The night is for hunting
46   Marsden, John   Darkness, be my friend
47   Griffiths, Andy   Treasure fever!
48   Fox, Mem   Time for bed
49   Winton, Tim   Dirt music
50   Allen, Pamela   Who sank the boat?
51   Marsden, John   The other side of dawn
52   Marsden, John   The third day, the frost
53   Morton, Kate   The forgotten garden
54   Fox, Mem   Hello baby!
55   Fox, Mem   The magic hat
56   Fox, Mem   Hattie and the fox
57   Clement, Rod   Feathers for Phoebe
58   Winton, Tim   Cloudstreet
59   Adelaide, Debra   The household guide to dying
60   Courtenay, Bryce   Sylvia
61   Fox, Kathryn   Skin and bone
62   Marsden, John   Burning for revenge
63   Jordan, Toni   Addition
64   Graham, Bob   The trouble with dogs
65   Fox, Mem   A giraffe in the bath
66   King, Stephen Michael   Mutt dog!
67   Watts, Frances   Kisses for daddy
68   Biddulph, Steve   Raising boys: why boys are different, and how to help them become happy and well-balanced men
69   Vaughan, Marcia K   Wombat stew
70   Wild, Margaret   Puffling
71   Costain, Meredith   Doodledum dancing
72   Lester, Alison   Purr: talk to the pet animals
73   Wild, Margaret   Lucy Goosey
74   Baker, Jeannie   Mirror
75   Silvey, Craig   Jasper Jones: a novel
76   Graham, Bob   How to heal a broken wing
77   Rodda, Emily   The wizard of Rondo
78   Gleeson, Libby   Amy & Louis
79   Watts, Frances   Parsley Rabbit’s book about books
80   Fox, Mem   Wombat divine
81   Graham, Bob   Tales from the waterhole
82   Whatley, Bruce   Little white dogs can’t jump
83   Wild, Margaret   Chatterbox
84   Gleeson, Libby   Cuddle time
85   Griffiths, Andy   The big fat cow that goes kapow
86   Bruce, Jill B   Flags and emblems of Australia
87   French, Jackie   Diary of a wombat
88   Lester, Alison   Moo: talk to the farm animals
89   Blabey, Aaron   Pearl Barley and Charlie Parsley
90   Reilly, Matthew   Scarecrow
91   Allen, Pamela   Grandpa and Thomas
92   Metzenthen, David   Winning the World Cup
93   Allen, Pamela   Mr McGee and the perfect nest
94   Rodda, Emily   The key to Rondo
95   Marsden, John   Incurable
96   Clitheroe, Paul   Making money: the keys to financial success
97   Allen, Pamela   My first 123
98   Bruce, Jill B   Prime ministers of Australia
99   Treasure, Rachael   The cattleman’s daughter
100   Rodda, Emily   The forests of silence

Note: The listing of a title does not necessarily imply that the author has submitted a claim.

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Appendix 2:

PLR—100 highest scoring books 1974–75 to 2012–13

This table lists in order the 100 books that have achieved the highest single-year PLR scores over the last 38 years. It is based on the results of the annual surveys of public lending libraries conducted since the PLR scheme began in 1974.

  AUTHOR   TITLE
1   Courtenay, Bryce   Tommo & Hawk
2   Courtenay, Bryce   The potato factory: a novel
3   Jennings, Paul   Unbelievable! More surprising stories
4   McCullough, Colleen   The thorn birds
5   Jennings, Paul   Quirky tails: more oddball stories
6   Jennings, Paul   Uncanny! Even more surprising stories
7   McCullough, Colleen   An indecent obsession
8   Courtenay, Bryce   Jessica
9   Courtenay, Bryce   Solomon’s song
10   Jennings, Paul   Unmentionable! More amazing stories
11   Marsden, John   The night is for hunting
12   Courtenay, Bryce   Sylvia
13   Fox, Mem   Possum magic
14   Base, Graeme   The eleventh hour: a curious mystery
15   Jennings, Paul   Unreal! Eight surprising stories
16   Marsden, John   So much to tell you
17   McInerney, Monica   Those Faraday girls
18   Jennings, Paul   The paw thing
19   Henderson, Sara   The strength in us all
20   Reilly, Matthew   The six sacred stones
21   Jennings, Paul   Undone! More mad endings
22   Park, Ruth   The harp in the south
23   Jennings, Paul   Unbearable: more bizarre stories
24   Jennings, Paul   Round the twist
25   Courtenay, Bryce   Four fires
26   Courtenay, Bryce   Matthew Flinders’ cat
27   Base, Graeme   Animalia
28   Grenville, Kate   The secret river
29   Marsden, John   The other side of dawn
30   Facey, A B   A fortunate life
31   Courtenay, Bryce   Brother fish
32   Courtenay, Bryce   Smoky Joe’s cafe
33   Jennings, Paul   Uncovered! Weird weird stories
34   Reilly, Matthew   The five greatest warriors
35   Fox, Kathryn   Skin and bone
36   Courtenay, Bryce   The Persimmon tree
37   Marsden, John   Tomorrow, when the war began
38   Li, Cunxin   Mao’s last dancer
39   Courtenay, Bryce   The power of one
40   Lester, Alison   Are we there yet?: a journey around Australia
41   Reilly, Matthew   Scarecrow and the Army of Thieves
42   Henderson, Sara   From strength to strength: an autobiography
43   Gleitzman, Morris   Blabber mouth
44   Tsiolkas, Christos   The slap
45   Fox, Mem   Where is the green sheep?
46   Park, Ruth   Playing Beatie Bow
47   Winton, Tim   Dirt music
48   Jennings, Paul   The gizmo
49   Brooks, Geraldine   People of the book
50   Courtenay, Bryce   Whitethorn
51   Nunn, Judy   Floodtide
52   McCullough, Colleen   A Creed for the third millennium
53   Winton, Tim   Breath
54   Morrissey, Di   The silent country
55   Reilly, Matthew   Seven ancient wonders
56   Morrissey, Di   The plantation
57   McCullough, Colleen   The ladies of Missalonghi
58   Marsden, John   Burning for revenge
59   Bruce, Jill B   Flags and emblems of Australia
60   Morrissey, Di   The valley
61   Reilly, Matthew   Scarecrow
62   Baker, Jeannie   The story of Rosy Dock
63   Morrissey, Di   Barra Creek
64   Morgan, Sally   My place
65   Carey, Peter   Oscar and Lucinda
66   Marchetta, Melina   Looking for Alibrandi
67   Nunn, Judy   Maralinga
68   Jennings, Paul   The cabbage patch fib
69   Jennings, Paul   The gizmo again
70   West, Morris   Masterclass
71   Park, Ruth   Missus
72   Morrissey, Di   The songmaster
73   Courtenay, Bryce   Fishing for stars
74   Courtenay, Bryce   The story of Danny Dunn
75   Morrissey, Di   The opal desert
76   Keneally, Thomas   Schindler’s ark
77   Brooks, Geraldine   Caleb’s crossing: a novel
78   Morrissey, Di   The reef
79   Watts, Frances   Kisses for daddy
80   Morrissey, Di   Monsoon
81   McCullough, Colleen   The first man in Rome
82   Marsden, John   Darkness, be my friend
83   Drury, Susan   Bandits on horseback
84   Crew, Gary   Strange objects: a novel
85   West, Morris   Cassidy
86   Allen, Pamela   Mr McGee and the biting flea
87   Allen, Pamela   The potato people
88   Winton, Tim   The riders
89   Klein, Robin   Penny Pollard’s diary
90   Treasure, Rachael   The rouseabout
91   Graham, Bob   Crusher is coming!
92   Klein, Robin   Hating Alison Ashley
93   Lindsay, Joan   Picnic at Hanging Rock
94   Baker, Jeannie   Window
95   Vaughan, Marcia K   Wombat stew
96   Do, Anh   The happiest refugee: the extraordinary true story of a boy’s journey from starvation at sea to becoming one of Australia’s best loved comedians
97   Jennings, Paul   Round the twist: featuring Pink bow tie and Nails
98   Courtenay, Bryce   Fortune cookie
99   French, Jackie   Pete the sheep
100   Reilly, Matthew   Area 7

Note: The listing of a title does not necessarily imply that the author has submitted a claim.

 

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Appendix 3:

PLR—Range of payments by number of claimants 2012–13

RANGE CREATORS PUBLISHERS TOTAL
$100–$149 1389 46 1435
$150–$199 1037 33 1070
$200–$249 695 18 713
$250–$299 580 7 587
$300–$399 857 23 880
$400–$499 534 17 551
$500–$599 388 7 395
$600–$699 275 11 286
$700–$799 219 3 222
$800–$899 160 5 165
$900–$999 132 3 135
$1 000–$1 999 668 25 693
$2 000–$2 999 223 14 237
$3 000–$3 999 130 3 133
$4 000–$4 999 91 5 96
$5 000–$5 999 49 4 53
$6 000–$6 999 27 5 32
$7 000–$7 999 28 0 28
$8 000–$8 999 31 4 35
$9 000–$9 999 19 2 21
$10 000–$10 999 18 4 22
$11 000–$11 999 11 1 12
$12 000–$12 999 7 0 7
$13 000–$13 999 14 1 15
$14 000–$14 999 4 1 5
$15 000–$15 999 3 1 4
$16 000–$16 999 5 1 6
$17 000–$17 999 4 1 5
$18 000–$18 999 3 0 3
$19 000–$19 999 4 0 4
$20 000–$24 999 10 1 11
$25 000–$29 999 11 1 12
$30 000–$39 999 4 2 6
$40 000–$49 999 3 4 7
$50 000–$59 999 3 2 5
$60 000–$69 999 2 1 3
$70 000–$79 999 0 0 0
$80 000–$89 999 0 1 1
$90 000–$99 999 0 1 1
$100 000–$109 000 0 1 1
$110 000–$199 999 0 0 0
$120 000–$129 999 0 0 0
$130 000–$139 999 0 0 0
$140 000–$149 999 0 2 2
Above $150 000 1 1 2
TOTAL 7639 262 7901

 

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Appendix 4:

PLR—Range of payments by amount of payment ($) 2012–13

RANGE AUTHORS PUBLISHERS COUNT AMOUNT
$100–$149 172 607.09 5 670.77 1435 178 277.86
$150–$199 181 005.61 5 710.46 1070 186 716.07
$200–$249 155 412.46 3 941.07 713 159 353.53
$250–$299 158 803.53 1 908.55 587 160 712.08
$300–$399 295 175.61 7 974.75 880 303 150.36
$400–$499 238 798.26 7 601.86 551 246 400.12
$500–$599 212 190.94 3 838.17 395 216 029.11
$600–$699 178 183.32 7 072.17 286 185 255.49
$700–$799 163 861.86 2 316.72 222 166 178.58
$800–$899 135 869.84 4 254.67 165 140 124.51
$900–$999 125 104.01 2 804.76 135 127 908.77
$1000–$1999 947 560.91 35 517.16 693 983 078.07
$2000–$2999 544 119.67 33 369.49 237 577 489.16
$3000–$3999 450 380.80 11 299.40 133 461 680.20
$4000–$4999 409 685.23 22 273.44 96 431 958.67
$5000–$5999 269 125.67 22 619.38 53 291 745.05
$6000–$6999 174 457.26 32 810.89 32 207 268.15
$7000–$7999 208 677.61 0 28 208 677.61
$8000–$–8999 264 420.43 33 704.16 35 298 124.59
$9000–$9999 179 415.18 19 128.62 21 198 543.80
$10 000–$10 999 189 912.27 41 929.30 22 231 841.57
$11 000–$11 999 126 652.94 11 789.89 12 138 442.83
$12 000–$12 999 86 654.55 0 7 86 654.55
$13 000–$13 999 190 642.42 13 496.56 15 204 138.98
$14 000–$14 999 57 132.21 14 913.64 5 72 045.85
$15 000–$15 999 45 985.61 15 075.10 4 61 060.71
$16 000–$16 999 82 485.94 16 968.21 6 99 454.15
$17 000–$17 999 69 993.17 17 491.04 5 87 484.21
$18 000–$18 999 55 256.53 0 3 55 256.53
$19 000–$19 999 78 153.09 0 4 78 153.09
$20 000–$24 999 228 132.31 21 879.48 11 250 011.79
$25 000–$29 999 298 167.75 29 868.69 12 328 036.44
$30 000–$39 999 136 008.79 76 604.15 6 212 612.94
$40 000–$49 999 125 620.50 166 165.62 7 291 786.12
$50 000–$59 999 160 818.46 112 735.28 5 273 553.74
$60 000–$69 999 130 401.09 68 737.69 3 199 138.78
$70 000–$79 999 0 0 0 0
$80 000–$89 999 0 83 247.08 1 83 247.08
$90 000–$99 999 0 97 409.06 1 97 409.06
$100 000–$109 999 0 109 844.77 1 109 844.77
$110 000–$119 999 0 0 0 0
$120 000–$129 999 0 0 0 0
$130 000–$139 999 0 0 0 0
$140 000–$149 999 0 290 029.04 2 290 029.04
Above $150 000 159 785.08 246 889.93 2 406 675.01
TOTAL 7 686 658.00 1 710 566.01 7901 9 385 549.02

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Appendix 5:

PLR—Largest payments to creators 2012–13
(listed alphabetically)

 
Allen, Pamela Disher, Garry Jacobs, Sherry-Anne
Arena, Felice Dubosarsky, Ursula James, Ann
Badger, Hilary Fienberg, Anna Jennings, Paul
Baker, Jeannie Forsyth, Katherine Jinks, Catherine
Ball, Duncan Fox, Mem Kelleher, Victor
Barlow, Alexis French, Jackie Keneally, Thomas
Base, Graeme Gamble, Kim Kettle, Philip
Birch, Robin Gleeson, Libby King, Stephen Michael
Bland, Nicholas Gleitzman, Morris Lester, Alison
Brasch, Nicolas Gott, Robert Lord, Gabrielle
Brodie, Scott Graham, Robert Marsden, John
Carmody, Isobelle Greenwood, Kerry Masson, Sophie
Chapman, Garry Grenville, Kate Mcclish, Bruce
Ciddor, Anna Griffiths, Andy Mcfarlane, Susannah Mary
Clark, Margaret Guile, Melanie Mcinerney, Monica
Clark, Sherryl Harmer, Wendy Mcintosh, Fiona
Collins, Paul Harris, Christine Metzenthen, David
Coombe, Eleanor Hartnett, Sonia Moloney, James
Corris, Peter Harvey, Roland Morrissey, Di
Costain, Meredith Healey, Justin Nicholson, John
Courtenay, Bryce Heffernan, John Niland, Deborah
Crew, Gary Hetherington, Keith Nix, Garth
Daddo, Andrew Hill, Marji Nunn, Judy
D’ath, Justin Hirsch, Odo Ormerod, Jan
De Kretser, Theonne Hobbs, Leigh Panckridge, Michael
Denton, Terry Irvine, Ian Park, Louise
Pearson, Jane Rippin, Sally Walker, Anna
Pelusey, Jane Rowe, Jennifer Watt, Pete
Pelusey, Michael Rowe, Jeanette Whatley, Bruce
Prior, Natalie Rubinstein, Gillian Wild, Margaret
Pryor, Kimberley Smith, Craig Wilkinson, Carole
Pryor, Michael Thompson, Colin Winton, Tim
Pyers, Greg Thompson, Lisa  
Reilly, Matthew Wagner, Michael  

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Appendix 6:

PLR—Largest payments to publishers 2012–13
(listed alphabetically)

 
Acer Press Geoff Slattery Publishing P/L
Allan Cornwell P/L Giramondo Publishing Company
Allen & Unwin P/L Greater Glider Productions
Australian Geographic Education Hachette Livre Australia P/L
Bas Publishing Hardie Grant Books
Black Ink Press Hardie Grant Egmont
Blake Education Harpercollins Publishers
Blake Publishing Hybrid Publishers P/L
Bloomings Books P/L Hyland House Publishing
Borghesi & Adam Publishers Pty Ltd Indij Readers Limited
Brolga Publishing P/L Interactive Publications P/L
Cambridge University Press Jane Curry Publishing
Cengage Learning John Wiley & Sons – Wrightbooks P/L
Central Queensland Uni Press John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd
Choice Books Jojo Publishing
Crown Castleton Publishers Koala Books
Currency Press P/L Lemonfizz Media
Duffy & Snellgrove Library Of Australian History
Earth Garden Publishing Macmillan Education Australia
Era Publications Magabala Books
Explore Australia Publishing Pty Ltd Manna Trading Pty Ltd
Finch Publishing Margaret Hamilton Books P/L
Five Senses Education P/L Mcgraw-Hill Australia P/L
Flannel Flower Press Melbourne University Publishing Ltd
Floradale Publications Michelle Anderson Publishing P/L
Fremantle Press Murdoch Books
Murray David Publishing/M2d Publishing Schwartz Publishing (Black Inc)
New Frontier Publishing Pty Ltd Science Press
New Holland Publishers P/L Scribe Publications P/L
Omnibus Books Simon & Schuster (Aust) P/L
Oxford Uni Press (Trade) Spinifex Press
Pan Macmillan Australia P/L Thames & Hudson (Australia)
Pascal Press The Federation Press P/L
Pearson Education Australia P/L (Schools) The Five Mile Press P/L
Pearson Education Australia P/L (Tertiary) The Ghr Press P/L
Pease Training International The Spinney Press
Penguin Group Australia The Text Publishing Company
Pinedale Press Trekaway P/L – Ta Envirobook
Pluto Press Australia University Of NSW Press
Preston Reservoir Adult Community Education University Of Qld Press
Publishing & Data Uwa Publishing
Rachael Bermingham Wakefield Press P/L
Random House Australia P/L Walker Books Aust P/L
Rockpool Publishing Windy Hollow Books
Rosenberg Publishing P/L Woodslane Press
Sally Milner Publishing P/L Word Weavers Press
Scholastic Australia P/L Working Title Press

 

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Appendix 7:

ELR–100 highest scoring books 2012–13

This table represents the 100 highest scoring books from the results of the survey of books held in educational lending libraries for the 2012–13 ELR program.

  AUTHOR   TITLE
1   Fox, Mem   Possum magic
2   Rodda, Emily   Rowan of Rin
3   Vaughan, Marcia K   Wombat stew
4   Fox, Mem   Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge
5   Rodda, Emily   The Lake of tears
6   Marsden, John   Tomorrow, when the war began
7   Rodda, Emily   The forests of silence
8   Baker, Jeannie   Where the forest meets the sea
9   Gleitzman, Morris   Two weeks with the Queen
10   Fox, Mem   Hattie and the fox
11   Klein, Robin   Hating Alison Ashley
12   Klein, Robin   Boss of the pool
13   Gleitzman, Morris   Boy overboard
14   Ingpen, Roger   The wind in the willows
15   Jennings, Paul   Unreal! Eight surprising stories
16   Baker, Jeannie   Window
17   Ingpen, Roger   The secret garden
18   Base, Graeme   Animalia
19   Jennings, Paul   Unbearable: more bizarre stories
20   Jennings, Paul   Uncanny!: Even more surprising stories
21   Rodda, Emily   Finders keepers
22   Park, Ruth   Playing Beatie Bow
23   Jennings, Paul   The cabbage patch fib
24   Allen, Pamela   Who sank the boat?
25   Griffiths, Andy   Just annoying
26   Gleitzman, Morris   Misery guts
27   Rodda, Emily   City of the rats
28   Fox, Mem   Shoes from Grandpa
29   Gleitzman, Morris   Blabber mouth
30   Jennings, Paul   Unmentionable!: More amazing stories
31   Gleitzman, Morris   Once
32   Griffiths, Andy   Just crazy!
33   Jennings, Paul   The paw thing
34   Rubinstein, Gillian   Space demons
35   Lofts, Pamela   How the birds got their colours
36   Rodda, Emily   Dread Mountain
37   Marchetta, Melina   Looking for Alibrandi
38   Rodda, Emily   The Shifting Sands
39   Griffiths, Andy   Just stupid!
40   Catterwell, Thelma   Sebastian lives in a hat
41   Griffiths, Andy   Just disgusting!
42   Fox, Mem   Time for bed
43   Gleeson, Libby   Queen of the universe
44   Fox, Mem   Wombat divine
45   Rodda, Emily   Rowan and the travellers
46   Jennings, Paul   Unbelievable!: More surprising stories
47   Rodda, Emily   Rowan and the keeper of the crystal
48   Wild, Margaret   Our granny
49   Rodda, Emily   Cavern of the fear
50   Norrington, Leonie   The Barrumbi kids
51   French, Jackie   Hitler’s daughter
52   Rodda, Emily   The maze of the beast
53   Jennings, Paul   Undone!: More mad endings
54   Griffiths, Andy   Just tricking
55   Jennings, Paul   Round the twist
56   Wilkinson, Carole   Dragonkeeper
57   Winton, Tim   Lockie Leonard, human torpedo
58   Rodda, Emily   Rowan and the Zebak
59   Marsden, John   The rabbits
60   Matthews, P. E   The best pet
61   Blacklock, Dyan   I want earrings!
62   Gleitzman, Morris   Toad rage
63   Heiss, Anita   Who am I?: The diary of Mary Talence, Sydney, 1937
64   Lofts, Pamela   When the snake bites the sun
65   Meeks, Arone   Enora and the black crane
66   McDonald, Meme   My Girragundji
67   Base, Graeme   The eleventh hour: a curious mystery
68   Gleitzman, Morris   Girl underground
69   Adams, Jeanie   Pigs and honey
70   Rodda, Emily   The Valley of the Lost
71   Laguna, Sofie   Too loud Lily
72   Klein, Robin   Penny Pollard’s diary
73   Fox, Mem   Koala Lou
74   Rodda, Emily   Return to Del
75   Rodda, Emily   Shadowgate
76   Jennings, Paul   Uncovered!: Weird weird stories
77   Knowles, Sheena   Edward the emu
78   Jennings, Paul   Quirky tails: more oddball stories
79   Brian, Janeen   Dog Star
80   Rodda, Emily   The key to Rondo
81   Hill, Anthony   The burnt stick
82   Matthews, P. E   The sea dog
83   Rodda, Emily   Fuzz the famous fly
84   Baker, Jeannie   Belonging
85   Rodda, Emily.   Dragon’s nest
86   Wagner, Jenny   John Brown, Rose and the Midnight Cat
87   Rodda, Emily   The isle of illusion
88   Carroll, Jane   Jade McKade
89   Base, Graeme   TruckDogs: a novel in four bites
90   Graham, Amanda   Arthur
91   King, Stephen Michael   Mutt dog!
92   Forrestal, Elaine   Someone like me
93   Matthews, P. E   A year on our farm
94   Jennings, Paul   Unseen
95   Wild, Margaret   There’s a sea in my bedroom
96   Reece, James   Lester and Clyde
97   Thiele, Colin   The monster fish
98   Griffiths, Andy   Just shocking!
99   Walker, Kate   Elephant’s lunch
100   Winton, Tim   Blueback

Note: The listing of a title does not necessarily imply that the author has submitted a claim.

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Contact details

Phone (toll-free) 1800 672 842

Email lendingrights@pmc.gov.au

Website www.arts.gov.au/literature/lending_rights

Postal address
Lending Rights
GPO Box 3241
Canberra ACT 2601

 

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